Objective: Answer all the questions in these reading guides in order to prepare for the quizzes.

Take vocabulary words and Cultural References from these reading guides and turn them into definitions and descriptions in our moodle Glossaries.

Reading Guide for Oresteia: "The Eumenides" [Day One]

Videos
The Familial Web
Deep Background

Video Viewing Guide

Common Vocabulary

prototype
anarchy
mantic
libation
atrocious
mandate
whet
ewe
matricide
purge
wraith
measure
regalia
capacious
heinous
nullify
lap
lull
pall
oracle
bombasitc
suppliant
bay
consummation
mean
invest
patriarchal

Technical Vocabulary

thespian [what's the etymology of this word?]
"gender asymmetry"
'satyr play"
talio
burlesque
genre
"progressivist argument"
abstract/abstraction
concrete
polis

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Cultural References

Oracle at Delphi
navelstone
Athena
Apollo
Dionysus
Furies
olive branch
Harpies
Acropolis
Gorgon
Artemis
Areopagus
Cassandra
Mycenae
Argos
Phytho
lyre
aegis

 

 

 

 

Introduction to the Trilogy

What change did Aeschylus make to the basic structure of the play?
What's the general and simplest outline you can give for the course of action over the whole of the trilogy?
Why is the doctrine of "talio" a problem? Today we might call this problem a . . . ?
In "The Eumenides," Athena set something up for the first time: What did she establish?
During the course of the plays, the job of the Furies changes: At first, their job was to do WHAT [?], but by the end of "The Eumenides," Athena had talked them into doing WHAT[?]
What is more important than the arguments made during and the outcome of the trial itself?
What is Zeus's general spiritual law?
Clytaemnestra is often thought to be not traditional: What's abnormal about her?
Why does the ending of "The Eumenides" create "gender asymmetry" according to the editors?
Athena is said to be an ally of males despite her gender: What's her argument for being such an ally?
What was the political status of women in Athens and how does the fate of the Furies support that status?
What power is the female associated with in ancient Greece? On the other hand, what processes are males associated most closely with? How is the situation of the characters in this play similar to Job's situation in The Book of Job? What is Cassandra's dilemma? How are images treated in the Oresteia trilogy?
What is the repeated metaphorical image running throughout the Oresteia trilogy? Can you make up your own use of that metaphorical image?

The Eumenides [Day One]

What's the first time the repeated metaphorical image pointed out and emphasized by the introduction is use in "The Eumenides"? Who are the sons of gods, the ones who built roads?
Who is "he" in line 14?
Who takes over the Oracle in the end and who was in charge just before that?
Why is the detail "no wings" significant to The Pythia?
Whose job is it to get the women out of the oracle?
Who required Orestes to kill his mother and why?
What job does Apollo charge Hermes with?
What drink did Clytaemnestra offer to the Furies?
What does Clytaemnestra say the job of the Furies is and why is she berating them about it?
Who is the child of Zeus that the the Furies address directly and what do they accuse him of?
What do the Furies see at the earth's central point and what do they think is causing that to appear?
What kind of activities are part of the Fury's "love feast" according to Apollo?
The leader of the Furies accuses Apollo of being responsible for WHAT exactly?
According to the Fury's leader what is the difference between a matricide and the murder of one's husband?
What, in a nutshell, are the two sides of the argument between the Furies and Apollo?
Why is marriage so important and sacred to Apollo?
The Furies: Where do they find Orestes and what's he doing when they find him?
Orestes says the stain on his hand is fading: What's the stain and why is it fading?
Where does Orestes think Athena might be off to when he calls on her?
What does Orestes ask Athena NOT to bring with her if she comes? Does she obey this request?
If you haven't committed a crime, what do the Furies promise you? How is this the same or different from what is promised to humans in The Book of Job?
Who cannot tell the Furies what to do and why can they not do so?